Hot Industries to Turn to in 2014

February 2014

The new year is in full swing, and the job market is hot! It's time to actually put your resolutions to work and see what else is out there. For those looking to change careers in the 2014 don’t go into the process blindly. Instead, focus on industries with a strong growth outlook or steady job placements.

In 2014, job growth is expected to be similar to what we saw in 2013; steady growth at a slow pace. We’re seeing an improving economy that isn’t making huge jumps each month, which is what you want for long-term growth and stabilization. Within the forecast, there are industries that will have higher employment needs for the coming year, and they’re great places to start if you are considering changing careers.

We expect to see high employment demand in the following industries:

- Healthcare: With the Affordable Care Act (ACA) individual mandate taking effect in 2014, a surge in healthcare related fields is expected. In addition, the baby boomer generation is reaching retirement age and requiring additional care and assistance, which has placed higher needs on at home nurses, caretakers and healthcare providers in general.

- Human Resources: New regulations related to the ACA are bringing heavier paperwork to human resources departments who will have to focus on making sure the business complies with the new laws. Additional paperwork suggests a higher need for HR support staff and administrative roles.

- Accounting: The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the field of accountants and auditors to grow 13.1 percent over the next eight years. If you have a knack for numbers, this is a great industry to turn to with a steady employment rate and solid starting salary. Positions in Demand for 2014: Tax Accountants, SEC Reporting Managers, Management Accountants

- IT: With technology continually changing and improving, there is always a need for software developers, IT business analysts and individuals proficient in various computer programs. If you’re serious about a technology career, Moran suggests taking training courses to properly educate and prepare prospective employees.